Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 27, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 27, 2015

Nepal needed immediate help after an earthquake, but Nepal turned away Taiwan’s aid from fear of Beijing; India, China, and Pakistan were invited to the party. Russia agrees to sell missiles to China, setting off alarms, some too loud, others not loud enough. Eyes are turning to Taiwan.

Some claim that the West would not defend Taiwan if attacked by China because Taiwan isn’t important enough. But, others explain that losing Taiwan would encourage Beijing to go farther. Regardless, China’s growing reputation precedes it more and more. And more eyes turn to a growing shadow that creeps toward Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Top Aricle

Don’t Let China Swallow Taiwan

…It would only encourage China to continue. Know why!

China

Hundreds of Chinese Cities Don’t Meet Air Standards, Report Finds

Iran backs pipeline to China under ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative: ambassador

ASEAN avoids confronting Beijing

…Taiwan was ready to help Nepal in the aftermath of the recent earthquake, but Beijing said no.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 7, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 7, 2015

When viewing China as a corporate conglomerate attempting a hostile takeover, with the goal of complete market monopoly in every sector, Asia’s conflict only starts to make sense. But the problem goes deeper. According to credible, anonymous reports, there are “mental health conditions” that are frequent in Chinese-Asian culture.

Specifically is the belief that, “If another individual does not join our group (family, organization, business, club, etc.) or otherwise comply with our unilateral demands, then that other individual is proactively and maliciously attempting to change our group’s destiny. Then, our only option is to either dominate that other individual at all costs, even at the expense of our own goals and/or survival, and to sever all communication except communication for us to achieve our ‘unchangeable destiny’, which is for that individual to join or obey us one way or another.” Because of the adamantine, unabashed, and costly determination to hold to this kind of belief, this recurring belief may be an ideal candidate for a clinically-certifiable personality disorder. Read More

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, March 16, 2015

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, March 16, 2015

A thorough and thoughtful article catches wind, documenting China’s threats against Great Britain over Hong Kong. Based on records declassified in 2013, the Crown wanted independence for Hong Kong long ago, but Beijing threatened invasion. The Hong Kong we know has been a store front so China can access the world and so Taiwan would become jealous, which it has not. This research article surfaced in the wake of the foreseeable publicizing effect of the Umbrella Movement’s forte. Now, reports are suggesting that, not only do China’s promises no longer matter, but they probably never mattered in the first place.

Bullies make threats because they fear conflict. Victors reply, “It doesn’t matter,” before the fight. Peacemakers are usually the most powerful. China has one problem that goes largely unreported: They have not been tested by war as the last four generations of American soldiers have been. China’s other problems are starting to make headlines, including the fact that Taiwan is finding its heart.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

When it comes to Chinese-speaking pastors and the Chinese government, the Chinese are very non-communicative. It’s a shame and a sham, literally—a shame because of the “Shame” culture that can’t man-up to face hard talks and a sham because it’s always hiding some greater aspiration of self-indulged grandeur. China’s boasts of its “great cities” show enough, along with God’s determination to humble the proud with the stampede that killed 36 in Shanghai, now being spun by Chinese media.

Taiwan’s KMT leadership also announces that the press must stand behind the red tape—interestingly literal as it is figurative. When reporters want to understand the reason for a public demonstration, the police will escort witnesses to be interviewed. Not to worry, they will surely choose a fair balance. With this, the KMT definition of “free” will be very difficult for many people to understand—and no matter what the KMT says, the Taiwanese press will probably not be satisfied.  · · · →