Cadence of Conflict: Asia, May 18, 2015

It all happened in a week. Man-made land isn’t sovereign land says UN. 12 nautical miles is “sovereign”. US Navy to park inside 12 miles of China’s man-made islets in the making; a volatile military standoff is inevitable. A US invitation to Beijing for annual Navy practice must also invite Taiwan! Beijing rebukes.

Taiwan’s controlling, Beijing-friendly KMT-Nationalist party has no strong Presidential candidate; opposition DPP has one front-runner with party-wide support. Beijing won’t be happy.

US unveils new multi-purpose drones. China enacts old multi-warhead nukes. Japan was never a better friend to the US, says Kerry.

Kerry and Xi smile for the camera in a series of meetings resemblant of pre-WWII Europe; USA Today reports Xi describing the situation as “stable”, a description that wouldn’t necessary if it were true.

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US House passes RIMPAC Taiwan rule

…If Beijing practices with US Navy, so can Taiwan, Beijing won’t be happy. And…

China Making Some Missiles More Powerful

…NY Times, diagrams and explanation of MIRV and timeline

What’s Going On with President Ma?  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 27, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 27, 2015

Nepal needed immediate help after an earthquake, but Nepal turned away Taiwan’s aid from fear of Beijing; India, China, and Pakistan were invited to the party. Russia agrees to sell missiles to China, setting off alarms, some too loud, others not loud enough. Eyes are turning to Taiwan.

Some claim that the West would not defend Taiwan if attacked by China because Taiwan isn’t important enough. But, others explain that losing Taiwan would encourage Beijing to go farther. Regardless, China’s growing reputation precedes it more and more. And more eyes turn to a growing shadow that creeps toward Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Top Aricle

Don’t Let China Swallow Taiwan

…It would only encourage China to continue. Know why!

China

Hundreds of Chinese Cities Don’t Meet Air Standards, Report Finds

Iran backs pipeline to China under ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative: ambassador

ASEAN avoids confronting Beijing

…Taiwan was ready to help Nepal in the aftermath of the recent earthquake, but Beijing said no.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 7, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 7, 2015

When viewing China as a corporate conglomerate attempting a hostile takeover, with the goal of complete market monopoly in every sector, Asia’s conflict only starts to make sense. But the problem goes deeper. According to credible, anonymous reports, there are “mental health conditions” that are frequent in Chinese-Asian culture.

Specifically is the belief that, “If another individual does not join our group (family, organization, business, club, etc.) or otherwise comply with our unilateral demands, then that other individual is proactively and maliciously attempting to change our group’s destiny. Then, our only option is to either dominate that other individual at all costs, even at the expense of our own goals and/or survival, and to sever all communication except communication for us to achieve our ‘unchangeable destiny’, which is for that individual to join or obey us one way or another.” Because of the adamantine, unabashed, and costly determination to hold to this kind of belief, this recurring belief may be an ideal candidate for a clinically-certifiable personality disorder. Read More

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, March 16, 2015

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, March 16, 2015

A thorough and thoughtful article catches wind, documenting China’s threats against Great Britain over Hong Kong. Based on records declassified in 2013, the Crown wanted independence for Hong Kong long ago, but Beijing threatened invasion. The Hong Kong we know has been a store front so China can access the world and so Taiwan would become jealous, which it has not. This research article surfaced in the wake of the foreseeable publicizing effect of the Umbrella Movement’s forte. Now, reports are suggesting that, not only do China’s promises no longer matter, but they probably never mattered in the first place.

Bullies make threats because they fear conflict. Victors reply, “It doesn’t matter,” before the fight. Peacemakers are usually the most powerful. China has one problem that goes largely unreported: They have not been tested by war as the last four generations of American soldiers have been. China’s other problems are starting to make headlines, including the fact that Taiwan is finding its heart.  · · · →