Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 26

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 26

US Congress questions HK: Beijing vets HK politicians; is HK not China? “Experts” say Washington appeases Beijing, but the big issue: Don’t pee in the international pool, consider HK’s Hague membership. Washington and Beijing have only found excuses to raise Pacific tensions, including China’s nine-dash line and Kerry’s extradition request of espionage witness, Snowden. Appeasing Beijing would mean Congress not raising the HK question at all.

It was wise to release HK Umbrella Movement leaders without pressing charges (yet). Even wiser would be if Beijing made one change years ago: Rather than vetting HK politicians before elections, vet HK policy after—free elections, but anti-Beijing policy would automatically impeach a HK CEO. That would have given Beijing the power they want (and arguably deserve since China provides HK’s military) and given HK residents what they want without asking.

Beijing can no longer hope Taiwan would accept so-called “Beijing democracy” after rejecting the HK Umbrella Movement.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 12

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 12

Power shuffling and truth-spinning throughout Asia—heads roll and chests puff-out as waning establishments grab for anything to stay afloat. China bails the floundering Communist oil world then doubles its amphibious infantry without a way to transport them. North Korea issues friendly threats to the US. Hong Kong Umbrella Movement leaders are brought to open court where they can bash Beijing even more. Hong Kong legislators open umbrellas inside (for bad luck?) The US disagrees with itself about giving Taiwan permission to fly a flag, China objects to everything. A non-corrupt and popular Taiwanese mayor is attacked by the “other” political party after refusing to associate with their officials currently being investigated for corruption.

The first Taiwanese president from the opposition party was just released from prison by the “other” party that just lost elections. Taiwan’s record unpopular president from the “other” party supports flying the same Taiwanese flag in the US that he would not fly when China visited Taiwan early in his tenure.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

When it comes to Chinese-speaking pastors and the Chinese government, the Chinese are very non-communicative. It’s a shame and a sham, literally—a shame because of the “Shame” culture that can’t man-up to face hard talks and a sham because it’s always hiding some greater aspiration of self-indulged grandeur. China’s boasts of its “great cities” show enough, along with God’s determination to humble the proud with the stampede that killed 36 in Shanghai, now being spun by Chinese media.

Taiwan’s KMT leadership also announces that the press must stand behind the red tape—interestingly literal as it is figurative. When reporters want to understand the reason for a public demonstration, the police will escort witnesses to be interviewed. Not to worry, they will surely choose a fair balance. With this, the KMT definition of “free” will be very difficult for many people to understand—and no matter what the KMT says, the Taiwanese press will probably not be satisfied.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Hong Kong’s Umbrella movement has completely shifted out of the public eye. Beijing and Hong Kong authorities will likely view this as a victory, while the West and the East Asian region know that steam does not vanish merely because it escapes the pot.

America’s Republican party seems that they haven’t learned from Taiwan’s failing KMT-Nationalists. The recent bait-and-switch involving two tea party Republicans plucked the ceiling off of corporate campaign donation limits. This means that the GOP knows they need the tea party vote, but hope to use corporate dollars to overcome the people. The problem is that the KMT’s corptocracy failed on November 29 at Taiwan’s local elections. Now, the highest leader the KMT can find to lead their stock-holding political party is the mayor of New Taipei—comparable to if Republican’s had to turn to a Chicago suburb’s mayor for an RNC leader during the W. years, rather than the President being the leader as is normally the case.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, December 1

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, December 1

Taiwan’s landslide election was more historic than the Democrats’ whompping early November. The vote didn’t reject Taiwan’s KMT-Nationalist party as much as it rejected Beijing. One big factor ignored by media: Clearing HK demonstrators in Mong Kong two days before Taiwan elections solidified voters’ decision: The KMT’s de facto agenda of “Taiwan SAR” is unacceptable.

Taiwan’s Premiere “resigned” and President Ma “accepted” it. Rolling the head of the second in command is an old Chinese power tactic. Ma borrowed from the same playbook in his second election when he chose a new Vice President—the man who happened to be governor of Kaohsiung when the 24-year-old gasline was installed, which blew up a few months ago, killing 30 people, wounding 300, and turning one of the city’s beautiful streets into a WWI style trench. Even if Ma resigns as KMT Chairman, as Monday rumors claim, that would only embolden the East Asian culture of Taiwan, which loves the public beating.  · · · →