Cadence of Conflict: Asia, December 28, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, December 28, 2015

China steps up its game again. While companies won’t be required to give Beijing power to indiscriminately snoop the web, they are on notice to cooperate with coming procedures if they are asked. This time wasn’t the first, but it’s a little more clear, a little more friendly, and a little more toothy than the last.

Taiwan’s likely Presidential victor party, the DPP, has adopted a policy effectively outlawing the KMT-Nationalist party practice of owning for-profit businesses. The policy is wise by many measures, respect from the US and an even greater increase in voter support notwithstanding.

Since the US stepped up its own game, $1.8B to Taiwan, China is not happy.

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Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 9, 2015

The two presidents of the two governments of China met in Singapore. The exiled government was protested on the island where it remains in exile. It was a wild week. Taiwan’s president, Ma, defended the importance of dialog while nearly every branch of his government clashed with protests.

The meeting comes at the brink of significant change. Taiwan is about to undergo a historic turnover of political powers. This may be the last chance the fading KMT-Nationalist establishment has for high-profile dialog with their Communist arch enemy in Beijing.

While China appears as strong as it is controversial, the US whispers about undisclosed technologies that the Communists will not want to encounter in the Pacific. Everyone has his story.

China

A Day After Summit, China Again Warns Taiwan Against Independence

US defense chief warns of conflict in S. China Sea

…”‘Surprising’ new technologies”

Goldman’s BRIC Era Ends as Fund Folds After Years of Losses

…”The excitement came from the rapid growth from China…”

Taiwan

Ma defends significance of meeting with Xi

Protesters, police injured in overnight demonstrations

…Sunflower students return, stormed military base, college official arrested, police clash at legislature and presidential palace

Meeting limits Taiwan’s cross-strait options: Tsai

Further reading…

Protesters rally to condemn meeting

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Cadence of Conflict: Asia, October 5, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, October 5, 2015

A report came in: Taiwan is tied with Israel for the world’s 13th most powerful military. It will be interesting to see whether China discusses this over tea with the Britons next week.

Bon Jovi had been booted from China for paying homage to the Dalai Lama when they added Taiwan to their itinerary, only to get booted from Taipei by a typhoon that never arrived. A presidential hopeful in Taiwan may get booted from her own party. Internal politics plague Taiwan’s pro-Beijing KMT-Nationalist party one quarter before the presidential election. Food and auto issues plague TPP in Japan. China simmers.

Though more Mezzo Piano Adagio this week than previous, the Cadence continues. China is probably busy after all it learned from meeting the enemy and its funding enterprises face-to-face.

China

Britain to host Chinese leader on first state visit

Taiwan

HUGE BREAKING: Hung to be pulled in favor of Chu

Taiwan has world’s 13th strongest military: report

Farglory, Taipei Dome architects to face committees

…Symbol of Taiwan’s failed KMT-Nationalist party: an arena with no foundation, about to have licenses revoked

Storm brews over second typhoon day

…The storm that cancelled Bon Jovi’s concert in Taiwan

Bon Jovi press statement (video)

Japan

TPP talks stuck on auto, drug and dairy issues

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Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 31

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 31

Kim’s dismissal of top military leaders mirrors the downfalls of history. Top leaders are Kim’s strongest supporters. North Korea’s power could be imploding. “One Korea” could happen peacefully.

Japan prepares to make it’s military more deployable. The US gave the nod in recent months. Now, the Japanese government is ready to follow suit. Japan has maintained a “defense-only” military as a condition of the WWII surrender. Soon, Japan will be able to aid in regional conflict, such as with Korea or, say, Taiwan and Beijing.

China’s spotlight is more of a laser. Taiwanese officials take domestic flack over attending a Chinese V-Day celebration. The US isn’t happy about spying. China isn’t happy about reporting. Sanctions are on the way.

China

U.S. developing sanctions against China over cyberthefts

China says 197 punished in crackdown on online rumors

Japan

Thousands protest Abe, security bills at Diet rally

…Soon to be allowed to deploy troops for wider range of reasons

Korea

North, South Korea agree to defuse crisis after marathon talks

North Korea’s Kim ousts top officials, credits nuclear weapons with securing deal

South Korea Red Cross proposes family reunion talks with North

North Korea agrees to talks with South on family reunions

Taiwan

Why Taiwanese leaders should skip the Victory Day parade in Beijing

…Inside baseball on the China-Taiwan conflict.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 3, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 3, 2015

Propaganda backfired this week. Beijing wants more Internet censorship, almost to create a “Chinanet” akin to another Great Schism not seen since the Orthodox Church split from the West. TPP failed. Students in Taiwan stormed government offices to keep out China-propaganda over “minor” changes to national curriculum. An Australia-India-Japan alliance plumed out of nowhere. Taiwan and Japan are kissing and making up. And some truth came through well-kept gates.

An 18-year-old got back from his year in North Korea. The North Koreans shower together like Americans and Romans. North Korean students are curious about mundane life in America. And, notably, North Koreans seem to agree with a Americans: Government is the problem, not the people.

Joshua Wang, Hong Kong, had an interview with the BBC and explained that the Umbrella Movement never really had a plan and never communicated a plan to the public. But they did succeed in raising public awareness.  · · · →