Cadence of Conflict: Asia, June 27, 2016

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, June 27, 2016

China seems to be the talk of town, especially with hitting. China cyberattacks hit the US less, but more strategically, says a study. A hailstorm tornado hit China and killed 98, critically wounded 200 and injured another 600 in a farming and factory village. Chinese bank management hit employees on stage at a training session for under-performance shows a video, the bank apologized.

But people are also “out”. India wanted in on a nuke control group, but claims that China kept India out. A group of Taiwanese involved in a phone scam in Cambodia were going to be deported to “China”, even though airline companies would know that their passports would keep them out at the destination. The Taiwanese complained and Cambodia delayed on sending them out. And, interestingly after Britain voted out of the EU, a new party in Hong Kong wants out of China by going back to Britain first, but only for a short time.

The Symony’s Cadence does not make any judgment or prediction concerning Hong Kong, except that, without vying to supply its own military as Singapore does—and without strong respect and peace with China and other countries as Singapore has—Hong Kong never has an answerable prayer of independence.

Read More

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, January 25, 2016

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, January 25, 2016

Since Taiwan’s election, China and the KMT-Nationalists have been largely silent. While the Chinese aren’t spending as much money at home, and while the Chinese economy looks evermore shaky, Xi Jinping has no problem dealing with Egypt or declaring all but war against Israel. Historically, talking ill of Israel is bad political luck. Perhaps China thinks itself the exception to many things.

Taiwan’s pro-China KMT-Nationalist party is out for the count. Defeated. Wind knocked-out. Humiliated. It’s over. And, it is surprising. Not only did the KMT respond by acknowledging their defeat; its members showed no awareness of how their pro-China policies would dissolve their power at home nor how their mismanagement of domestic disarray from poor policies would make their aspirations untenable. There was no way the could win, yet the only seem to have seen this in retrospect.

That hindsight realization could have a contagious affect and spread to US policy. The Obama administration has made a Trump nomination and victory ever bit as inevitable as how Taiwan’s DPP opposition victory owes thanks to Taiwan’s Ma administration. Tsai couldn’t not have won in 2016 just how Obama couldn’t have lost with George W. Bush’s foreign policies and refusal to respond to the press. Maybe the West will get wise. This year, there were no Chinese missiles fired across Taiwan, as there was in 1996. Few things indicate that Beijing is learning like this.

Read More