Prelude to Conflict: Asia, February 9

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, February 9

Three trends spanned the Pacific this week: journalism, entrepreneurs, and 2016 elections. News of ISIS spreads across Asia Pacific, including videos of a man being burned alive. China barks at century-old Taiwanese government leaders about standing up to the young Communist regime. Taiwanese local leaders respond that Beijing should learn to move past the past and just get along. A former US official, Richard Bush, unofficially speculates (without actually speculating) on China’s yet-to-be-seen reaction to Taiwan’s 2016 likely election swing away from the floundering, grossly unpopular, de facto pro-China, incumbent KMT-Nationalist party. The recently acquired economic powerhouse, Hong Kong, receives more lectures from Communist Beijing, which only alienate the upcoming generation; though there is little to suggest that Hong Kong’s successful entrepreneurs have been invited to lecture new Chinese businesses on how to catch up to the former British colony. Beijing’s solution to the Umbrella Movement is to change high school curriculum to remind students how much they need China.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, February 2

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, February 2

Hong Kong is back at it, this time marching on local elections. Japan is outraged over Muslims beheading one of their own, Asia is watching. Taiwan’s President is ever less popular and now with more proof than ever. Little news happened this week, but much analysis and beautiful night pictures of Hong Kong and Taiwan are going viral. The media would have us think that life in Taiwan sure is great. Is war near? Taiwan will be a major question, arguably the linchpin because of both reputation and regional strategy.

When Shang Kai-Sheck fled to Taiwan in 1949 during China’s Communist revolution, Beijing had a golden opportunity.  They could have declared victory.

The Communists knew that they would not be able to pursue the KMT-Nationalists because taking Taiwan is nearly impossible, even today. If Beijing’s goal was reunification, they should have declared a Machiavellian victory, pretended to recognize Taiwan as a nation, and normalized relations.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 19

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 19

All eyes turn to Tainan, Taiwan. Mayor Lai refuses to attend city council meetings until the investigation of the speaker’s dubious election is resolved. A political opponent holds a sign on the council floor referring to “Emperor Lai”. Beijing’s new commercial flight lines, abruptly announced and unusually close to Taiwan sovereign airspace, come in the context of anti-[pro-Beijing]-incumbent elections, such as Lai’s re-election with 72.9%. The defeated party has a record of being favored by China. Hong Kong took the higher road, Joshua Wong (黃之鋒) was released without charges, yet. This further reduces reasons for protests. The HK CEO suspects unnamed foreign power influence, typical of both the West’s messiah complex and Beijing’s paranoia. Everything is ongoing.

Taiwan

CAA, military reject China flight routes

Taiwan takes air route issue to ICAO

Six indicted in Chinese espionage ring case

Tainan councilor slams Mayor Lai over ‘no-show’

HK

Joshua Wong and Scholarism members released without charge after reporting to police

‘It’s better than nothing’: British Foreign Office backs Beijing’s reform framework for Hong Kong

CY Leung repeats claim of ‘external forces’ influencing Occupy – but provides no evidence

China

China stocks suffer biggest one-day tumble since June 2008

Time – China’s Boom Is Over — and Here’s What You Can Do About It

China’s Special Operation Forces have limited capacity compared with America’s

…Analytical collection of various articles, including translation from Chinese.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

When it comes to Chinese-speaking pastors and the Chinese government, the Chinese are very non-communicative. It’s a shame and a sham, literally—a shame because of the “Shame” culture that can’t man-up to face hard talks and a sham because it’s always hiding some greater aspiration of self-indulged grandeur. China’s boasts of its “great cities” show enough, along with God’s determination to humble the proud with the stampede that killed 36 in Shanghai, now being spun by Chinese media.

Taiwan’s KMT leadership also announces that the press must stand behind the red tape—interestingly literal as it is figurative. When reporters want to understand the reason for a public demonstration, the police will escort witnesses to be interviewed. Not to worry, they will surely choose a fair balance. With this, the KMT definition of “free” will be very difficult for many people to understand—and no matter what the KMT says, the Taiwanese press will probably not be satisfied.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Hong Kong’s Umbrella movement has completely shifted out of the public eye. Beijing and Hong Kong authorities will likely view this as a victory, while the West and the East Asian region know that steam does not vanish merely because it escapes the pot.

America’s Republican party seems that they haven’t learned from Taiwan’s failing KMT-Nationalists. The recent bait-and-switch involving two tea party Republicans plucked the ceiling off of corporate campaign donation limits. This means that the GOP knows they need the tea party vote, but hope to use corporate dollars to overcome the people. The problem is that the KMT’s corptocracy failed on November 29 at Taiwan’s local elections. Now, the highest leader the KMT can find to lead their stock-holding political party is the mayor of New Taipei—comparable to if Republican’s had to turn to a Chicago suburb’s mayor for an RNC leader during the W. years, rather than the President being the leader as is normally the case.  · · · →