Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 24, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 24, 2015

North Korea does it’s annual late summer saber-rattling while the US and South Korea run their annual pre-autumn laps on the peninsula. Everyone’s in an uproar and “this time” it could be dangerous—again. Back to school.

China’s market slows while it’s naval activity rises. Chinese business is no longer the talk of town, though banking is as Beijing goes liquid. 400 deep pockets lost $182B USD to China’s sinking tech.

Taiwan’s election season continues to heat up. In this week’s episode of old school v democracy, DPP Mayor William Lai threatened to close the KMT-Nationalist-controlled Taiwan Control Yuan if the Control Yuan tries to close him, but not Speaker Lee who was found guilty in a lower court of buying the votes that gave him his speakership. Apparently, the Control Yuan is not even a Constitutionally legal entity. China does is own gossip among Americans about the DPP. So, it’s clear how important the Taiwan 2016 election will be.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 3, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, August 3, 2015

Propaganda backfired this week. Beijing wants more Internet censorship, almost to create a “Chinanet” akin to another Great Schism not seen since the Orthodox Church split from the West. TPP failed. Students in Taiwan stormed government offices to keep out China-propaganda over “minor” changes to national curriculum. An Australia-India-Japan alliance plumed out of nowhere. Taiwan and Japan are kissing and making up. And some truth came through well-kept gates.

An 18-year-old got back from his year in North Korea. The North Koreans shower together like Americans and Romans. North Korean students are curious about mundane life in America. And, notably, North Koreans seem to agree with a Americans: Government is the problem, not the people.

Joshua Wang, Hong Kong, had an interview with the BBC and explained that the Umbrella Movement never really had a plan and never communicated a plan to the public. But they did succeed in raising public awareness.  · · · →

July 7, 2015

Video: Trump lays out all current issues

China imploding: four big companies stop trading

Greece’s ‘kickass’ motorcyclist ex-finance minister

Europe not ‘debt’ crisis; ‘democracy’ crisis

Money trouble brewing in southern Italy

Murderer chose San Francisco ‘Sanctuary City’

Old Post Office, 15 illegals contracted by third party don’t like Trump’s comments

Bernie Sanders: worthy Hillary rival

Should have listened to the folks, in biz as in politics: Reddit: “We Screwed Up”

 · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, June 29, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, June 29, 2015

China’s economy is tanking if you look at sales reports, or, no, wait, it’s going up if you ask the Chinese. China is also losing in the battle for Vietnam’s alliance: Moscow is now buddy-buddy with Hanoi.

Taiwan’s internal politics are all over the map with a presidential election schedule running near-parallel to the US 2016 election. Both countries look like they will elect a leader that wants to “deal smart” with China—against Beijing’s de facto policy of demanding that the world allow itself to be annexed by Beijing. Beijing has already rejected what looms in 2016 like a slave owner rejecting a slave’s desire to “normalize relations”.

Speaking of slavery, China is now an expert on human rights, lecturing the US. It is almost comedic, not because of the gross difference in numbers, but because China has so consistently told the US that countries should mind their own business. It seems Beijing has reversed that precedent with a new one.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, June 22, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, June 22, 2015

The MERS virus in South Korea is having a social-networking effect on the young generations of Taiwan and Hong Kong. With the virus in South Korea, flights are being cancelled and students in both countries who planned to visit South Korea are likely to reschedule to new flights from Hong Kong to Taiwan and vice versa. It is conventional student culture in Asia to make frequent visits between Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. When the Mandarin speakers of Taiwan and Hong Kong can’t go to Japan or South Korea, they tend to prefer each other as their “Plan B” travel plans. So, more HK and Taiwan students will be talking to each other this summer than normal. Interestingly, both HK and Taiwanese students had their own anti-Beijing expansion movements just last year. Their summer break travel has already begun.

Beijing is now fighting against the unanticipated consequences of chaos caused by a virus.  · · · →