Prelude to Conflict: Asia, March 16, 2015

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, March 16, 2015

A thorough and thoughtful article catches wind, documenting China’s threats against Great Britain over Hong Kong. Based on records declassified in 2013, the Crown wanted independence for Hong Kong long ago, but Beijing threatened invasion. The Hong Kong we know has been a store front so China can access the world and so Taiwan would become jealous, which it has not. This research article surfaced in the wake of the foreseeable publicizing effect of the Umbrella Movement’s forte. Now, reports are suggesting that, not only do China’s promises no longer matter, but they probably never mattered in the first place.

Bullies make threats because they fear conflict. Victors reply, “It doesn’t matter,” before the fight. Peacemakers are usually the most powerful. China has one problem that goes largely unreported: They have not been tested by war as the last four generations of American soldiers have been. China’s other problems are starting to make headlines, including the fact that Taiwan is finding its heart.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, February 16

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, February 16

Propaganda turn of the tide. For years, Chinese have attended international circles, promulgated their talking points, and convinced others to unwittingly do the same. But, recent reports explain that having traffic lights and convincing drivers to stop at them are two different things.

China’s military has some technology, flaunts technology it does and doesn’t have, but lacks the first-world culture necessary to support its technology. The US has better technology, conceals the technology, “reveals” technology it wants China to know about, and certainly has the organized culture to make its technology work.

This week, China prepares to celebrate the Chinese New Year, which commemorates the creation of the KMT-Nationalist-controlled Chinese government 104 years ago, which is not the government founded by the Communist Party, but the government of Taiwan. Taiwan celebrates the same New Year that Beijing still recognizes, though China has not been reported to give homage to the 104 year old government that has been in exile since 1949.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 19

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 19

All eyes turn to Tainan, Taiwan. Mayor Lai refuses to attend city council meetings until the investigation of the speaker’s dubious election is resolved. A political opponent holds a sign on the council floor referring to “Emperor Lai”. Beijing’s new commercial flight lines, abruptly announced and unusually close to Taiwan sovereign airspace, come in the context of anti-[pro-Beijing]-incumbent elections, such as Lai’s re-election with 72.9%. The defeated party has a record of being favored by China. Hong Kong took the higher road, Joshua Wong (黃之鋒) was released without charges, yet. This further reduces reasons for protests. The HK CEO suspects unnamed foreign power influence, typical of both the West’s messiah complex and Beijing’s paranoia. Everything is ongoing.

Taiwan

CAA, military reject China flight routes

Taiwan takes air route issue to ICAO

Six indicted in Chinese espionage ring case

Tainan councilor slams Mayor Lai over ‘no-show’

HK

Joshua Wong and Scholarism members released without charge after reporting to police

‘It’s better than nothing’: British Foreign Office backs Beijing’s reform framework for Hong Kong

CY Leung repeats claim of ‘external forces’ influencing Occupy – but provides no evidence

China

China stocks suffer biggest one-day tumble since June 2008

Time – China’s Boom Is Over — and Here’s What You Can Do About It

China’s Special Operation Forces have limited capacity compared with America’s

…Analytical collection of various articles, including translation from Chinese.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

When it comes to Chinese-speaking pastors and the Chinese government, the Chinese are very non-communicative. It’s a shame and a sham, literally—a shame because of the “Shame” culture that can’t man-up to face hard talks and a sham because it’s always hiding some greater aspiration of self-indulged grandeur. China’s boasts of its “great cities” show enough, along with God’s determination to humble the proud with the stampede that killed 36 in Shanghai, now being spun by Chinese media.

Taiwan’s KMT leadership also announces that the press must stand behind the red tape—interestingly literal as it is figurative. When reporters want to understand the reason for a public demonstration, the police will escort witnesses to be interviewed. Not to worry, they will surely choose a fair balance. With this, the KMT definition of “free” will be very difficult for many people to understand—and no matter what the KMT says, the Taiwanese press will probably not be satisfied.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Hong Kong’s Umbrella movement has completely shifted out of the public eye. Beijing and Hong Kong authorities will likely view this as a victory, while the West and the East Asian region know that steam does not vanish merely because it escapes the pot.

America’s Republican party seems that they haven’t learned from Taiwan’s failing KMT-Nationalists. The recent bait-and-switch involving two tea party Republicans plucked the ceiling off of corporate campaign donation limits. This means that the GOP knows they need the tea party vote, but hope to use corporate dollars to overcome the people. The problem is that the KMT’s corptocracy failed on November 29 at Taiwan’s local elections. Now, the highest leader the KMT can find to lead their stock-holding political party is the mayor of New Taipei—comparable to if Republican’s had to turn to a Chicago suburb’s mayor for an RNC leader during the W. years, rather than the President being the leader as is normally the case.  · · · →