Cadence of Conflict: Asia, December 7, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, December 7, 2015

A day which shall live in infamy.

While the world pauses to remember the day the US was provoked into entering WWII, the headlines paused over China the week before. All eyes, including Thailand’s, are on violence from the Mid East.

China and Taiwan swap spies. US and China swap hackers. China and Russia swap satellites. Reporters swap sympathies and memos. And everyone is supposed to think that there will be peace that lives alongside infamy. But that’s only for those who forget.

Though quietly at times, the Cadence marches on toward Pacific conflict.

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Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 30, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 30, 2015

Strength against China grows. The people of Taiwan don’t hate China; they want friendship with China. This makes them stronger than people who want subordinates and acquisitions. Communist Beijing and pro-China-control Taipei seem out of touch.

Research consistently demonstrates that a sizable majority of Taiwanese identify themselves as quite distinct from China. The KMT-Nationalist establishment views national sentiment as a result of opposition party propaganda rather than the opposition party’s power being an expression of national sentiment. The Nationalists don’t seem to understand that their policies help their opposition more than any campaign strategy could.

China rejected the entry of the young Miss World Canada winner. She wanted to participate in the global contest in Hainan. She spoke out on Human Rights and was turned away at her connection terminal. This put her in the global spotlight. Yet, it is doubtful that Beijing will be able to recognize, let alone accept, the power they gave this young girl.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 23, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 23, 2015

In the recently reported war games, the Pentagon probably did not consider the largest army in the world: America’s hunters. Most States have an army of hunters larger than most countries. And, if we combine that with all the bullets owned by the Weather Channel (pork-barrel spending?) and all the location data provided by the Weather Channel apps, there should be no problem defeating the Russians or any other military if they come into America, which is probably why the Russians won’t come to America, which is probably why no scenario ends with us defeating the Russians… because in those scenarios, they never actually collide with the US citizens anyway.

Hong Kong held an election. Chinese troops rehearsed with Americans for the first time—a sign that the masses are expected to take to mean all is well. Obama, reportedly, doesn’t like China’s territorial claims. And, now, ISIL managed to get on China’s laundry list; that just might have bought world peace for another decade, though minor conflicts can’t be avoided, such as the Pacific conflict already brewing.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 16, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 16, 2015

The week buzzed about China’s currency while the US spotlight made an unusual stop on Taiwan.

Marco Rubio mentioned Taiwan, something significant for an experienced Senator and presidential candidate on the campaign trail. Quartz gave a shout over Taiwanese presidential hopeful, Tsai, in her response to the negative Facebook comments from China (where Facebook happens to be banned). The US State Department even commented about Taiwan as a “beacon of truly representative government”, signifying as proof that Asia is not entirely inept on the matter of Human Rights.

China, by contrasting reports and comment, is the economic dirt devil, so goes the spotlight this week anyhow. China’s money is about to dominate the IMF. Northern China must choose between either cold winters or toxic air. And China continues to meddle with its own currency.

And, by the way, the Pentagon doesn’t seem to get much support from the current White House concerning China.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 2, 2015

Cadence of Conflict: Asia, November 2, 2015

In pre-WWII terms, last week, North Korea tried a “Hitler” in Southern seas and got sent home running. This week, the US did a sail by and China pulled a “France”. It’s clear who’s boss of the Pacific.

At least that’s what the Pentagon will think.

China’s response, though proof that it lacks strength, neither proves weakness nor will. Chinese are calculating and polite. Chinese conflicts do not escalate slowly; the pressure builds slowly, then the conflict erupts faster than American’s can blink.

But there is more going on with indirect communication, and Beijing is learning, for better or worse. In all likelihood, Beijing expected the US to react like most Chinese do to new power’s assertion. Specifically, they expected either silence or some kind of neighboring buildup. Remember, China is the land of the Great Wall. They built the islands with a fleet, they probably expected the US to confront them either with a fleet or not at all.  · · · →