Prelude to Conflict: Asia, April 28

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, April 28

China and the West want China and the West to know that they are in a prelude to war. Here are a few reasons why from recently…

Taiwanese protest leader visits AC; urges vigilance to protect democracy

Wei Yang

US-Japan treaty applies to islands: Obama

KMT legislator Lin calls Japanese stupid, rigid

…Pro-China Taiwan controlling faction, KMT, insults US ally over Nuke Plant issue, Fukushima

Protests back anti-nuclear hunger strike

This is becoming a big issue in Taiwan, and now and is being used to fuel regional tension by Taiwan’s KMT ruling faction.

China seizes Japanese ship for “failure to return ship leased before World War II”

…this has many precedent ramifications that are far-reaching, including that China may owe the world over 1 trillion $US.

China’s secret? It owes Americans nearly $1 trillion

Japanese MP who was angry that Michelle didn’t join president on Tokyo trip makes extraordinary claim that Obama CHEATS and their looming divorce is ‘an open secret’

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, April 21

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, April 21

China and the West want China and the West to know that they are in a prelude to war. Here are a few reasons why from recently…

TAO rejects renegotiating pact

…apparently the Chinese think that negotiating an agreement is no different from the necessary step of Congress ratifying the agreement. An easy oversight if your legislature is only a façade.

Japan to arm remote island, risking China tensions

Obama to boost US’ ‘rebalance’ to Asia with diplomacy tour

To Buy or Not to Buy? A Dilemma for Taiwan’s Navy

The ‘United Front’ Unveiled: Through The Looking Glass on Cross-Strait Relations

Taiwan’s and China’s ruling political parties are becoming as indistinguishable as Orwell’s “Animal Farm” pigs.

‘Sunflower’ Students Change History

Read an eBook about the last 21 hours of the Sunflower Movement occupancy.

The Sunflower movement made history this month. As Taiwan’s government was deviating from the will of its people, unarmed students disrupted the legislature by occupying it for three weeks. An unplanned, flash-mob protest met outside the legislature on March 18. Both the students and the legislature’s Speaker, Wang Jin-pyng, took peaceful action and the situation resolved without violence. Wang promised to require transparency for any future trade agreements and the students promised to leave peacefully. After three weeks, the students kept their promise, leaving only a sign translated “Congress of the People” at the front of the chamber and, on the Speaker’s desk, a widely used academic book from the late 19th century with collection of stories on political corruption.

Now, non-violent protesters who highlight “Constitutional compliance”, “individual liberty”, and “national sovereignty” have proven that they can remain non-violent, if the police do not use force to remove them.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, April 15

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, April 15

China and the West want China and the West to know that they are in a prelude to war. Here are a few reasons why from recently…

U.S. defense chief gets earful as China visit exposes tensions

‘White Justice Social Alliance’ supports precinct chief

…pro-China fake demonstrations in Taiwan, ostensible “social movement” bearing the name only a bureaucrat would create, indicating interference with issues that broach Taiwan-China relations

Officials pass the buck on removal of ART protesters

Internal-political tension rising inside Taiwan over issues not normally mentioned in world news

The end of China’s soft power?

Shifts in power and manner

DPP thanks U.S. House of Representatives for passage of H.R. 3470, The Taiwan Relations Act Affirmation and Navel Vessel 6 Transfer Act of 2014

US continued support for Taiwan, in midst of Chinese statements  · · · →

Puppet Democracies Are for Children: Washington “Adults” don’t Understand

Taiwan’s government does not have a robust system of checks and balances as the US does. Instead, has the near identical system of making laws as China’s government: new law doesn’t come from Congress or the President, but from the “Premiere”, a non-elected bureaucrat who heads the Executive branch comprised of other non-elected bureaucrats—in Taiwan the Executive Yuan, in China the State Council. The “puppet” nature of Taiwan’s democracy sheds some light on Taiwanese’s overall frustration with their government. It is reflected in the KMT’s recent proud remarks—that excessive power remains in the hands of the Executive branch, unlike Article 1, Section 8 of the US Constitution—read yesterday’s Taipei Times report for the inside baseball.

According to the Taipei Times article, if the Legislature does not approve the law proposed by the executive bureaucrats, then they have the authority to pass the motion into law as if it had been voted on.  · · · →