Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 12

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 12

Power shuffling and truth-spinning throughout Asia—heads roll and chests puff-out as waning establishments grab for anything to stay afloat. China bails the floundering Communist oil world then doubles its amphibious infantry without a way to transport them. North Korea issues friendly threats to the US. Hong Kong Umbrella Movement leaders are brought to open court where they can bash Beijing even more. Hong Kong legislators open umbrellas inside (for bad luck?) The US disagrees with itself about giving Taiwan permission to fly a flag, China objects to everything. A non-corrupt and popular Taiwanese mayor is attacked by the “other” political party after refusing to associate with their officials currently being investigated for corruption.

The first Taiwanese president from the opposition party was just released from prison by the “other” party that just lost elections. Taiwan’s record unpopular president from the “other” party supports flying the same Taiwanese flag in the US that he would not fly when China visited Taiwan early in his tenure.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, January 5

When it comes to Chinese-speaking pastors and the Chinese government, the Chinese are very non-communicative. It’s a shame and a sham, literally—a shame because of the “Shame” culture that can’t man-up to face hard talks and a sham because it’s always hiding some greater aspiration of self-indulged grandeur. China’s boasts of its “great cities” show enough, along with God’s determination to humble the proud with the stampede that killed 36 in Shanghai, now being spun by Chinese media.

Taiwan’s KMT leadership also announces that the press must stand behind the red tape—interestingly literal as it is figurative. When reporters want to understand the reason for a public demonstration, the police will escort witnesses to be interviewed. Not to worry, they will surely choose a fair balance. With this, the KMT definition of “free” will be very difficult for many people to understand—and no matter what the KMT says, the Taiwanese press will probably not be satisfied.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, December 29

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, December 29

Taiwan hit headlines again this week. More popular than New York, London, and Paris for New Years Eve. Home to a just-finished military head quarters after an 18-year construction project. An ever unpopular President facing oil-food scandal bribery allegations. And, now, object of all China’s military fears, as obviously false Chinese media propaganda tells.

Taipei is more popular than Beijing and opposition party mayors are more popular than Taiwan’s failing president. Communist and KMT-Nationalist rage with jealousy. Ma was China’s only hope to secure Taiwan and, thus, the Pacific. Now that corruption and unpopularity are surfacing like a beached whale, Beijing’s boy is no longer an asset in the hostile takeover of Taiwan, 50th largest nation in the world, 2014.

Chinese media openly and flagrantly speaks of invading Taiwan. This shameless self-exposure could possibly be the last straw after HK’s “defeated” Umbrella’s rained much needed light on Beijing’s deafness. The world can no longer avoid the obvious: Beijing avoided the military option to take over Taiwan, not because they wanted peace, which they don’t, but because they know Taiwan is militarily and geographically unbreakable.  · · · →

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, December 22

Prelude to Conflict: Asia, December 22

China made two well-crafted blunders which Beijing likely considers a success. China called for US arms sales to Taiwan to cease, then Xi went to Macau where democracy supporters could protest him more directly at the second inauguration of Macau’s CEO. Macau’s protest was reportedly led by Jason Chao (周庭希).

Japan removed the most at-risk fuel rods from Fukushima, a preventative measure. Jack Ma (马云), the Chinese businessman with an “American dream” who founded Alibaba, gave counter-intuitive wisdom to Taiwanese—the kind of ideas one would expect from Americans, but not from old guard Mandarin-speaking business owners.

Taiwan now has approval from Obama to purchase four US Perry-class frigates, sparking China’s formal complaint. Perhaps Beijing overlooked the fact that their complaint grants the US expanded permission to file future formal complaints with China. Taiwan is also building a lighthouse on the disputed “Itu Aba” Taiping Island (太平島) adjacent to a runway which is being engineered for military air support.  · · · →

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Cadence of Conflict: Asia-America, December 15

Hong Kong’s Umbrella movement has completely shifted out of the public eye. Beijing and Hong Kong authorities will likely view this as a victory, while the West and the East Asian region know that steam does not vanish merely because it escapes the pot.

America’s Republican party seems that they haven’t learned from Taiwan’s failing KMT-Nationalists. The recent bait-and-switch involving two tea party Republicans plucked the ceiling off of corporate campaign donation limits. This means that the GOP knows they need the tea party vote, but hope to use corporate dollars to overcome the people. The problem is that the KMT’s corptocracy failed on November 29 at Taiwan’s local elections. Now, the highest leader the KMT can find to lead their stock-holding political party is the mayor of New Taipei—comparable to if Republican’s had to turn to a Chicago suburb’s mayor for an RNC leader during the W. years, rather than the President being the leader as is normally the case.  · · · →