Cadence of Conflict: Asia, April 15, 2018

Events in China are playing out according to the “Pacific Daily Times Symphony Asian Mad Scientist Theorem“. The experimental phase in North Korea is finished and methods are being applied throughout China on a much grander scale. This week, we see reports of expensive ghost cities, comparable to Pyongyang. The debt to build those ghost cities could be enough to break China’s economy into the deprived status of northern Korea. Now, swelling human rights concern could court the West to support China’s unfriendly neighbors to intervene in China as the “grand liberators”.

If things continue on track with the theorem, China would end up in an armistice against its own provinces—a standoff between Beijing and fragments of the soon-to-be-formerly united China.

Trump continues to prove that he knows what he’s doing with Kim Jong-Un. The DPRK’s Great Successor will likely wise up, still venting steam once in a while. He seems to be one of the smartest heads of state in his region—seeking more cooperation with economic policies that work, not less. But even if not, Korea will not be a border for China to ignore. Beijing and its surrounding provinces would be the likely hold-out against a liberated Northwest, Tibet, Southern Canton, and it will need to keep a 24/7 guard in the Northeast. Break-aways could form their own federation, or not. Either way, as history repeats, we look to be headed for a Cold War -style standoff between fractured Chinese regions.

The US Marines are test driving “lightning carriers”—small aircraft carriers with a potently packed punch of F-35s. Their range radius is smaller, but so is their targetable shadow. In a Pacific conflict, a smattering of lightning carriers might prove more formidable than a single, central Nimitz class group. Federated, autonomous, small attack groups tend to be wise in warfare, as the French Revolution proved on land. We’ll see at sea.

These smaller carriers are said to focus on smaller tasks, putting Nimitz class carriers—now being called “super carriers”—in the spotlight against China and Russia. And, we know that the Chinese think the spotlight is an indication of “importance”. While Russia knows better, the Chinese probably don’t. Just because headlines read that a Nimitz class focuses on China doesn’t mean US strategy would fail if China’s new “anti-carrier” missiles sunk a Nimitz. Sinking a Nimitz class carrier would only enrage the American public into a war that they couldn’t lose. That’s how history has always played out, anyway. But, the mistakes from history don’t seem to have much impact on Chinese President Xi, who is determined to revive Maoism at any cost. If Maoism is revived, it’s results will follow. That won’t end the standoff with Taiwan; it will add more uncontrolled lands to the standoff it was never strong enough to resolve.

Fears for Dalai Lama, 83, as spiritual leader is rushed 300 miles to a Delhi hospital after contracting a chest infection | Daily Mail

Trump reciprocates after North Korea’s Kim says he’s open to third summit | Fox News

National security trumps press freedom in survey | Taipei Times

Chinese academic to be deported for illegal entry | Taipei Times

Marines test ‘Lightning carrier’ concept in the South China Sea | Business Insider

You Will Get Shot Down: Why America’s Stealth F-22 and F-35 Can’t Be Matched | National Interest

China

China is pushing back against Taiwan for these three reasons | WA Post

Millions of Chinese youth ‘volunteers’ to be sent to villages in echo of Maoist policy | Guardian

‘China’s Manhattan’ Borrowed Heavily. The People Have Yet to Arrive. | NY Times

China’s Workers Are Protesting Tech’s Deadly ‘996’ Overtime Culture. Alibaba’s Jack Ma Says He Requires It. | Yahoo – Fortune

American Businesses Stayed Quiet On Chinese Hackers, Amid Concerns For Profits | NPR

Surprising reason China could rule world | news.com.au

US-China trade: Washington tempers demand that Beijing curb subsidies | CNBC